Tesla plans to introduce new "super-charger" fuel stations across Australia

If you are a fleet manager interested in reducing the ongoing fuel consumption and overall expenses of your organisation's vehicle fleet, you may be interested in a new story regarding Tesla's plans for the Australian market.

The automobile manufacturer is reportedly planning to introduce a range of electric green cars, which will be able to be recharged for free at a number of "super-charger" fuel stations across the country.

Tesla vice-president of worldwide sales says that there is a potential for Australian Tesla consumers to never again have to pay for fuel.

"Our goal is to make our car better than a gasoline car so that people will adapt. The challenge is, how do you get people to change? And if they have to compromise to do so, and if they have to settle for something, it's hard to get them to change," Mr Blankenship told Fairfax Media, as reported in an article published January 16.

"But give them a car like this... and say 'oh, by the way, you can drive all over for free', it's a compelling statement that people then want to get into the car, and that's the idea."

According to Fairfax, a number of Tesla electric charging stations have already been established on the east and west coasts of the US. A 30 minute recharge at each of these stations allows cars to travel upwards of 240 kilometres.

The idea has exciting implications for the future of the Australian automobile industry, however it is important to note that any wide scale unrolling of such electronic charging stations is still some way off yet.

For now, fleet managers looking for ways to reduce fuel expenses may want to consider investing in fleet management software which can provide them with sophisticated reporting software designed to keep track of day to day petrol consumption.

This can allow your organisation to determine where shortfalls in efficiency are occurring, such as vehicles which are in need of replacement or maintenance, or employees who are showing poor driving behaviour.



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